Tuesday, February 26, 2008

RAMBLINGS: BBQ Terminology

Terminology:

BBQ has a nomenclature all its own. Smoker, mops, sops, smoke ring, chimney and rack all mean something to the public at large that is very different from what it means to the BBQ enthusiast. Let’s take a minute to go over a few common ‘Qing definitions.

THE WET STUFF

Mops: A mop is the name for both a thin liquid that is used to keep a meet moist during smoking and the device used to apply it. The ingredients for mops vary greatly, but I most often use something with a base of apple juice.

Sauces: Sauces are usually, but not always, applied late in the cooking of the meat or after the meat is done. The styles of sauce are varied and are often geographically representative. Sauces are used to enhance or alter the taste of the meat.

Slathers
: A slather is a very thick sauce that is often mustard based. It is usually applied to the meat prior to the cooking. A slather helps to bind rubs to a meat, provide a crust or ‘bark’ and add flavor to the end product.

Marinades
: A marinade has two jobs. A marinade is especially useful in BBQ as it helps to break down the connective tissue in meet, making it more tender. This is important in our neck of the woods, as BBQ’ers often use rougher cuts, such as brisket. The other purpose of a marinade is to impart flavor. Meats are soaked in marinades for a significant amount of time prior to the cooking. Common ingredients in marinade are oil, vinegar, wine, citrus juice, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce and assorted dry spices.

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